Publications

Publications

2018 TWA Private Lands Summit - The Border Wall: Protecting Our Country or Dividing Our Interests?

2018 TWA Private Lands Summit - The Border Wall: Protecting Our Country or Dividing Our Interests?

We are hosting a broad panel of speakers to provide diverse perspectives on issues relating to border security and a possible physical wall along the Texas-Mexico border. Topics covered will include the criticality of border security, private property rights concerns, inadvertent wildlife impacts, and cross-border wildlife conservation efforts with Mexico.  Our goal is to provide attendees with a thought-provoking discussion on this important matter to help all make well-informed opinions for themselves.


Texas Wildlife Association - Who We Are

Texas Wildlife Association boils down to doing right by Texas. It’s about taking care of home.


Historic Wildlife of Texas

Historic Wildlife of Texas

TWA Magazine

These are some of the noteworthy species that were “numberless” when our great-great grandfathers settled this state. Now, these species are reduced to insignificance or gone forever. In 1860, Texas had 600,000 people who comprised less than 2 percent of the total U. S. population. Now, we have 28 million people who comprise over 8 percent of the U. S. population. When human habitation increases, wildlife habitat decreases.


Wild Hogs - Problems and Solutions

Wild Hogs - Problems and Solutions

Wildlife Resources

Regardless how hard we hunt them, hunting alone can’t keep up with the feral hog population explosion.


Spring’s Struttin’ Show

Spring’s Struttin’ Show

Wildlife Resources

Collective efforts from landowners and agencies ensure that wild turkeys continue to provide hunters with adrenaline-filled spring days.


Things You May Have Heard about Chronic Wasting Disease

Things You May Have Heard about Chronic Wasting Disease

Wildlife Resources

The prominence of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in the media waxes as new cases are discovered and wanes as the public’s interest fades once the disease’s presence ceases to be novel.  Chronic wasting disease is different from many other deer diseases in that its effects are initially subtle and take months to years to manifest in an animal.  The effects of CWD on populations take even longer to become evident.  In fact, CWD was first detected in free-ranging deer and elk in the early 1980s and only in the past 10 years have scientists been able to document effects of CWD on populations and even then, only in the areas of Colorado and Wyoming where CWD was first detected.


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